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When Ruby on Rails Is Not a Good Fit

When Ruby on Rails Is Not a Good Fit

It’s no secret that we love Ruby on Rails at Planet Argon. We’ve been part of the community for 13 years, and have built over a hundred applications using this framework since then. But just because it’s our framework of choice doesn’t mean it’s the right choice for your business. Over the years, we’ve had several companies approach us about their existing Ruby on Rails application, or with the idea of creating a new app in Rails, that we’ve directed away from this framework. In these situations, we could have pitched a maintenance or new build retainer. And if we weren’t looking out for these companies’ best interest, and instead only cared about making more money, that’s surely what we would have done. But as the experts in our field, it’s also our responsibility to educate companies on the smartest decision for their company – even if it means they don’t become a client of ours in the process (I think there’s a Spiderman reference in there somewhere about power and responsibility…). The reasons that Ruby on Rails is not a good fit varies depending on the company’s situation. Here’s one example where we turned a company away from a custom Ruby on Rails app, why we did it, and what we pointed them toward instead. A Mid-Size E-Commerce Website: Queen Bee Creations A few years ago, a local Portland-based bag and accessory company – Queen Bee Creations contacted us about their custom Ruby on Rails e-commerce application. They told us a story we’re very familiar with and have heard again and again: the freelance Rails developer who created and maintained their app was leaving...
How to use Live Templates for Ruby on Rails in RubyMine

How to use Live Templates for Ruby on Rails in RubyMine

What is Live Templates and why use it for Ruby on Rails Live Templates (aka Code Snippets in many text editors) is a simple solution allowing you to generate frequently-used custom code constructs, and quickly insert them in the editor. While RubyMine has a built-in set of keywords for Ruby and Rails, and provides autocompletion for them, there are cases when using shortcuts is more preferable. In the case of Ruby on Rails development, this is especially applicable to HTML and ERB tags. As you probably know when you start typing <% in .html.erb files, the IDE suggests inserting the whole tag, and puts the caret right inside: But there are alternatives that you may find more convenient, especially if you are used to the default shortcut ⇧⌘./Ctrl+Shift+. that inserts ERB expression printing tag <%= %>, which doesn’t have a similar version for the “non-rendering” Ruby code execution tag <% %>. This is exactly the kind of case where live templates come in handy because they allow you to create one. Here’s how: Go to Preferences / Settings | Editor | Live Templates. Choose Rails from the list of available language/markup templates, and hit + to add a new template: Then take the following steps: Create an abbreviation that you will type for a quick insertion in the editor (like erbext), and provide a description that will help you remember what a specific template does(F1). Type the code that should be generated in the Template text field. Specify where the cursor should be put after the template is inserted by typing $END$. In our case we want to have the caret right inside the tag. Finally, decide if you want to insert the tag with Enter, Tab, or Space, and choose in...
Easter Weekend Sale: Complete Web Developer Course 2.0 going for $19

Easter Weekend Sale: Complete Web Developer Course 2.0 going for $19

Rob Percival, the renowned coding instructor, released a completely revamped Web Developer course earlier this year. His first Web Dev course was the most popular of its kind to ever be released. In response to feedback from thousands of his students, Rob has renovated the course to make it even more comprehensive. The course is normally available for $200 from sites like Udemy, but for the next few days, you can snag it for from Tech Deals. We’re calling that a pretty stellar offer. The contains over 30 hours of content that will walk you through building 25 websites. You also gain access to Rob’s online forums where he actively engages his 95,000+ students. All students get lifetime access to all course materials. Course in a Glance: “Web developers are highly in-demand – that’s no secret. Whether you’re looking to build a lucrative career from scratch or pick up some extra cash building and monetizing your own websites, this course is a great place to start. With this fully immersive course that covers everything ‘code’, you’ll learn everything you need to start programming like a pro. It’s time to join the 21st century workforce!” Access 288 lectures & 30.5 hours of content 24/7 Learn fundamentals of HTML5, CSS3 & Python Build responsive websites w/ jQuery, PHP 7, MySQL 5 & Twitter Bootstrap Develop blogs & ecommerce sites w/ WordPress Discover smart ways to add dynamic content by using APIs Receive free unlimited web hosting for one year Make a Twitter clone to put your knowledge into action Ready to stop stalling and start coding? Click the button below to...

Fast JSON API serialization with Ruby on Rails

by Shishir Kakaraddi, Srinivas Raghunathan, Adam Gross and Ryan Johnston We are pleased to announce the open source release of Fast JSON API gem geared towards Ruby on Rails applications. Introduction Fast JSONAPI is aimed at providing all the major functionality that Active Model Serializer (AMS) provides, along with an emphasis on speed and performance, by meeting a benchmark requirement to be 25 times faster than AMS. The gem enforces performance testing as a discipline. Active Model Serializer is a great gem and Fast JSON API was inspired by it when it comes to declaration syntax and features. But, AMS begins to slow down when a model has one or more relationships. Compound document, AKA sideloading, on those models makes AMS slow down further. Throw in a need for infinite scroll on the UI, and AMS’s slowness starts becoming visible to users. Why optimize serialization? JSON API serialization is often one of the slowest parts of many well implemented Rails API’s. Why not provide all the major functionality that AMS provides and with great speed? Features: Declaration syntax similar to Active Model Serializer Support for belongs_to, has_many and has_one Support for compound documents (included) Optimized serialization of compound documents Caching Instrumentation with Skylight integration (optional) How do you write a serializer using Fast JSONAPI? We like the familiar way Active Model Serializers lets us declare our serializers. Declaration syntax of fast_jsonapi is similar to AMS. class MovieSerializer include FastJsonapi::ObjectSerializer attributes :name, :year has_many :actors belongs_to :owner, record_type: :user belongs_to :movie_typeend How fast is it compared to Active Model Serializers? Performance tests indicates a 25–40x speed gain over AMS, essentially making serialization time negligible on even...
Using Codeship Basic to Test Ruby on Rails Applications

Using Codeship Basic to Test Ruby on Rails Applications

Reading Time: Codeship offers developers a vast array of possibilities when creating a continuous integration and deployment pipeline for their applications. I want to focus today on how to build a solid CI/CD pipeline for a Ruby on Rails application with Codeship. Setting Up Your Local Environment Our tutorial has a few prerequisites: We’ll kick things off by configuring our local application. Once downloaded, we can test out the Docker build process by running docker-compose build. This command will tell Docker to pull in all our dependencies and build our container ecosystem. Once the container build is finished, we’ll now be able to run commands from within the container. More specifically, a successful container build allows us to run our test suite by using docker-compose run web bundle exec rspec. Our containers will then boot up, run our test suite, and exit. All of the tests should pass with flying colors. With a passing test suite in hand, we’ll now be able to move on to translating our setup for Codeship. Setting Up Your Codeship Basic Project With a local instance of our Dockerized application set up, we now can start building our Codeship build and deployment process. First, we’ll log into Codeship, navigate to the Projects tab, and create a new project. We’ll then select our method of Source Control (GitHub, Bitbucket, GitLab) and point Codeship towards our application. After our application connects, we’ll be presented with the option of making our project a Codeship Pro or Codeship Basic project. For this example, we’ll be running with Codeship Basic. Next up is the formulation of Setup Commands. Our...
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