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List of Top Ruby on Rails Developers in Singapore

List of Top Ruby on Rails Developers in Singapore

1. Vinova Vinova creates customised web apps, mobile apps and mobile games for clients which range from smaller scale as start-up individual to larger scale as enterprise corporate. Vinova has a team of experienced Ruby Developers who are committed to delivering flexible and quality RoR web development solutions to meet your business requirements. Vinova’s Ruby on rails development team is highly qualified and specifically concentrates on delivering simple, logical and most consistent high quality solutions to the clients. They have been architecting and building highly scalable web apps using technologies like Ruby on rails, Node.js, Angular.js, React.js, Python, Java etc.   2. Neo Previously under Pivotal Labs, the Singapore office was acquired by Digital Garage, and they operate 7 offices worldwide. Neo is a strong proponent of agile and lean methodologies. 3. Thoughtworks Thoughtworks is one of the largest players in the market, with 29 offices worldwide. Decades ago, its early employees wrote the Manifesto for Agile Software Development, setting up the basic principles of modern agile development methods. They still work there, ’nuff said. 4. Saigon, Silicon Straits Their team is based in Vietnam but operate as a joint venture with Silicon Straits as their development arm. Silicon Straits also manages its portfolio of startups, and operate a co-working space, under the leadership of James Chan. The Vietnam team are the people behind Geeky, a hiring tool for software engineers. 5. 2359 Media 2359 Media has its roots in mobile app development (it started out as a location-based advertising platform for mobile), but has built up a rails team in Vietnam, with some help from Geeky, the hiring tool that the Saigon team built. 6. Rubify Rubify...
6 Websites You Can Use To Become a Web Developer Today

6 Websites You Can Use To Become a Web Developer Today

Learning to become a web developer is one of the best investments you can make. If you’re a writer, you’ll be able to design every aspect of your blog with total creative control. If you’re in high school or younger, you’ll be able to make as much if not more money than your parents with skills that are in high demand. So instead of being all talk like a word warrior, you’ll become an actual man of money at any age. If you’re a career professional, you’ll add another skill to your set for you to ask for a raise or better: start your own business and begin a new life of freedom. Learning code is easy if you’re willing to put the time in and invest in yourself: the best investment you can make. Think of all the wasted hours watching TV, and playing video games. There is no return for these activities, so ideally they should have no place in your life. It’s “dead time“—you aren’t actually dead, but you aren’t living your life either. You’re living vicariously through the adventures of another, even if the controller is in your hands. You can become a fully fledged web developer in 4-6 months if you’re able to remove distractions from your life and focus on a brighter future for you. Online education is becoming a massive industry. People just like you are learning that there isn’t a reason to go to college anymore, and it’s no longer a safe place for men to further their skills. If you go to college your chances of catching a false rape allegation increase...
How to report an issue with your website to your web developer/agency

How to report an issue with your website to your web developer/agency

How to report an issue with your website to your web developer/agency Doesn’t work” isn’t a bug report We’ve been helping businesses with their websites since 2001. In that time we’ve had to deal with countless occasions where a client has reported when they think there is an issue on a website.  And in that time we’ve spotted common reporting bug problems which are worth having a chat about as this can help save a lot of time. What support are you paying for? One of the first things you (as the person reporting the problem) needs to ask youself is ‘what support agreement is in place?‘; i.e. if you don’t have any form of support agreement set up, then don’t expect support to be free, and don’t expect your issue to be serviced right away as the developer/agency may well be very busy with current projects – you have to pay extra to jump the queue of work already in the studio. Now, if you don’t have a support agreement in place (or it doesn’t match the level of service you think your business needs) then the simple answer is that you need to chat with your developer/agency. Many companies (including us), will typically have an informal period after a website goes live (if there is no support agreement in place) where things are just fixed, free of charge as this is, in essence, a bedding down period for the website. But please don’t be surprised if the agency makes it clear that this is not a long term, free support option; the bedding in period has to end at...
Penn Arts and Sciences Coding Boot Camp Will Make You a Web Developer in No Time

Penn Arts and Sciences Coding Boot Camp Will Make You a Web Developer in No Time

Technology New Philly Coding Boot Camp Will Make You a Web Developer in No Time One of the city’s top institutions will host it. Developing programming and coding technologies. scyther5 | iStock If you’re looking to expand your professional portfolio with some in-demand tech skills, there’s a new program option in Philly that you might want to consider. The University of Pennsylvania, in partnership with New York’s Trilogy Education Services, recently announced the launch of the Penn Arts and Science Coding Boot Camp, a 24-week coding program. Geared toward adult learners and working professionals, the program will equip students (with little to no experience in coding) with the basics of coding, algorithms and data structure. Participants will also receive intensive training in HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, jQuery, Java, Bootstrap, Express.js, React.js, Node.js, Database Theory, Bookshelf.js, MongoDB, MySQL, Command Line, Git, and more. Course material is adjusted according to market demand. In addition to regular classroom instruction that will be held at the Pennovation Center on Saturdays and two evenings every week, students will spend around 20 hours a week on outside projects and experiential learning activities. At the end of the 24-week period, which begins on January 23, 2018, participants will receive a certificate of completion from Penn Arts and Sciences. And at the cost of $11,950 total, the cohort of about 25 to start will also receive career-planning services, portfolio reviews, recruiting assistance and staff support. Trilogy is a continuing education program manager for institutions around the globe. It has already teamed up with 27 other institutions including Northwestern, Rutgers and UC Berkley Extension to host the coding boot...
A GIF-filled guide to being an unusually good web developer

A GIF-filled guide to being an unusually good web developer

What does it take to be a really good web developer? If you’re working at your first programming job, you probably found out quickly that it’s not easy. It’s one thing to watch coding tutorials, read programming books, and make portfolio sites. It’s quite another to have to build websites from spec, to meet deadlines, and most importantly, to make sure that your bosses and clients are happy! On top of all that, technology changes fast. You may feel like you have to stay on top of trends or risk becoming obsolete next year. Want to know a secret, though? You don’t have to be afraid. As you keep working, you will gain experience in your job. In the same way that you’ve learned coding, you can also learn how to perform at a high level at work. It’s possible to learn how to be a good web developer. And it’s even possible to be anindispensably good web developer. (Obviously, I can’t guarantee your job security, but you know what I mean.) My first job I’m a self-taught web developer, who never took a formal computer science course. I’ve currently been in the field for about seven years. And of course, I’ve struggled with the learning curve and with impostor syndrome. But I’ve also picked up a lot of valuable experience and skills along the way. You might find some similarities to my experience and your own. When I started out as a junior web dev in my first real job, I was beyond thrilled. But to be completely honest, I was terrified for the first two years. Every day...
Ruby on Rails – Need to Know

Ruby on Rails – Need to Know

1. What is Rails? Rails is a web application framework designed to work with the Ruby programming language. Sound like mumbo jumbo?! I know! Here’s the BIG idea: there is a programming language called Ruby. It’s super fun to write. In fact, the guy who first created it said that his major motivation when writing the language was to design a programming language that would make programmers happy. Nice, right? Let me give you an example. If I want to print something to the screen in PHP I need to write: echo “Hello World”; Notice the semi-colon? And what does echo even mean?!! On the other hand if I wanted to do the same thing in Ruby alls I would write is: puts “Hello World” No semi-colon, and puts may be a little… juvenile, but it makes more intuitive sense to me than echo. Seriously, when you spend hours and hours a day writing code, it’s the little things that make a HUGE difference. So, anyways, the only problem with Ruby was that it’s not designed for use on the Web. Like…you couldn’t really use it to make websites, per se. That is until… Rails! I am not sure if Rails was the first web framework for Ruby but it’s DEFINITELY the most popular. What Rails does is provide all this fancy scaffolding and stuff to make it possible to write a Ruby application and have it be a website. This sounds really abstract when you say it here, but it’s basically like this: if I were to write puts “Hello World” in an HTML document, you would just see the whole...
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